Facebook will open three new centres in Europe to train digital skills

(FILES) This file photo taken on December 12, 2007 shows the logo of social networking website 'Facebook' displayed on a computer screen in London. Facebook could be working on a smartphone, according to paperwork recently spotted by cyber sleuths which the tech giant filed earlier this year. A Facebook unit devoted to hardware filed a patent application in January 2017 for a mysterious "modular electromechanical device" that could have speakers, cameras, microphones, touchscreens, and displays.Facebook in April 2017 launched a mission to sync smartphone cameras' windows with augmented reality, focusing on what people have in hand instead of waiting for high tech eyewear. / AFP PHOTO / LEON NEALLEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images

Vastavam web: Facebook said on Monday it will open three new centres in Europe to train people in digital skills and committed to training one million people over the next two years, part of the social media giant’s drive to show its contribution to the bloc.Facebook said on Monday it will open three new centres in Europe to train people in digital skills and committed to training one million people over the next two years, part of the social media giant’s drive to show its contribution to the bloc.The community hubs will offer training in digital skills, media literacy and online safety to groups with limited access to technology, including old people, the young and refugees.

Facebook also committed to having trained one million people and business owners by 2020.“Absolutely we want to make sure that people see that we are investing locally, we’re investing in technology, we’re investing in humans,” Sandberg said.Smaller EU countries, like Luxembourg or Malta, argue that a solo EU move on corporate tax reform would damage its economy and favour competitors.European Union states could have lost 5.4 billion euros in tax revenues from Google and Facebook between 2013 and 2015, according to a report by an EU lawmaker last year.Smaller EU countries, like Luxembourg or Malta, argue that a solo EU move on corporate tax reform would damage its economy and favour competitors.

European Union states could have lost 5.4 billion euros in tax revenues from Google and Facebook between 2013 and 2015, according to a report by an EU lawmaker last year.