Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un set to land in Singapore for historic summit

FILE - This combination of photos show North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on April 15, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington on April 29, 2017. Threatening language between the U.S. and North Korea is flaring. After Trump vowed to respond with “fire and fury” if Pyongyang continued to threaten the U.S., the North’s military said it is finalizing a plan to fire four midrange missiles to hit waters near the strategic U.S. territory of Guam. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Files)

Vastavam web: U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are expected to land in Singapore today within hours of each other in advance of a historic summit over the reclusive country’s arsenal of nuclear weapons.The U.S. delegation, en route from the G7 meeting in Canada, will arrive Sunday evening, and Trump is set to meet with Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Monday.Officials onboard Air Force One include Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, National Security Adviser John Bolton, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders.

Kim’s private jet, a decades-old Il-62, departed Pyongyang late on Sunday morning and appeared to be headed for Singapore, South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency said without providing further details. Kim is expected to arrive on Sunday afternoon, landing at Changi airport.A direct flight from Pyongyang landed in Singapore on Saturday, raising speculation that a delegation of North Korean officials had joined an advance team headed by Kim’s close aide, Kim Chang Son, who was in Singapore to prepare for the talks.At stake at the summit are North Korea’s nuclear weapons and peace on the Korean Peninsula. North Korea spent decades developing nuclear weapons, culminating in the test of a thermonuclear device in 2017. It also successfully tested missiles that had enough range to reach the U.S. mainland.

The tests came amid a campaign of “maximum pressure,” led by the United States, that tightened economic sanctions against North Korea and raised the possibility of military action.After a flurry of contacts between the two Koreas, South Korean officials suggested to Trump in March that Kim would be willing to meet face-to-face.The summit comes after weeks of sometimes-contentious discussions and was briefly cancelled amid North Korean outrage over messaging from some U.S. advisers.