Trump fires Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Vastavam web: President Donald Trump forced out his attorney general on Wednesday and threatened to fight back if Democrats use their new majority in the U.S. House of Representatives to launch investigations into his administration and finances. Trump came out swinging a day after his Republicans lost control of the House, and followed through on repeated threats to remove Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

His departure was the first in what could be a string of high-profile exits as Trump reshapes his team to gird for his own 2020 re-election effort. The Republican president named Sessions’ chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, as acting attorney general and said he would nominate someone for the job soon. Nancy Pelosi, the House Democratic leader who could be the next speaker, said in a statement posted to Twitter that Sessions’ ouster was a “blatant attempt” to undermine the Russia probe. She urged Whitaker, who now oversees Special Counsel Robert Mueller and has argued Mueller’s investigation has gone too far, to recuse himself from any involvement.

During a combative news conference in which he tangled with reporters, Trump trumpeted his role in Republican gains in Tuesday’s midterm congressional elections, and warned of a “warlike posture” in Washington if Democrats investigated him. Trump said he could fire Mueller if he wanted but was hesitant to take that step. “I could fire everybody right now, but I don’t want to stop it, because politically I don’t like stopping it,” he said. Moscow denies meddling. Trump, calling the Mueller probe a witch hunt, has repeatedly said there was no collusion.

Trump was buoyed on Wednesday by victories that added to the Republican majority in the U.S. Senate, telling reporters at the White House that the gains outweighed the Democrats’ takeover of the House. The expanded Senate majority could make it easier for Trump to confirm a new attorney general, who will need a majority of votes in the 100-seat chamber.

“They can play that game, but we can play it better,” Trump said. “All you’re going to do is end up in back and forth and back and forth, and two years is going to go up and we won’t have done a thing.” The divided power in Congress combined with Trump’s expansive view of executive power could herald even deeper political polarization and legislative gridlock in Washington.

He said Pelosi had expressed to him in a phone call a desire to work together. With Democrats mulling whether to stick with Pelosi, who was speaker when the party last controlled the House, or go in a new direction, Trump wrote in a tweet earlier on Wednesday that she deserved to be chosen for the position.
Pelosi, at a Capitol Hill news conference before news of Sessions’ departure, said Democrats would be willing to work with Trump where possible. But she added: “We will have a responsibility to honor our oversight responsibilities and that’s the path we will go down. We again (will) try to unify our country,” she said.

A Senate majority would have allowed Democrats to apply even firmer brakes on Trump’s policy agenda and given them the ability to block any future Supreme Court nominees. House Democrats could force Trump to scale back his legislative ambitions, possibly dooming his promises to fund a border wall with Mexico and pass a second major tax-cut package. Legislators could also demand more transparency from Trump as he negotiates new trade deals with Japan and the European Union.