Kim Jong Un’s 28-year-old sister to visit South Korea for winter Olympics ceremony

FILE PHOTO: Kim Yo Jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, attends an opening ceremony of a newly constructed residential complex in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj/File Photo

Vastavam web: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s 28-year-old sister will make her debut on the world stage when she visits South Korea to attend the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics on Friday, Seoul’s Unification Ministry said.Kim Yo Jong would be the first member of the Kim family, born on the sacred Mount Paektu, which is a centerpiece of the North’s idolization and propaganda campaign, to cross the border to the South.

Her inclusion in the delegation is “meaningful” as she is not only the sister of the country’s leader but has a significant position as a senior official of the ruling Workers’ Party, the South’s presidential Blue House said.But the trip could become a source of contention between Seoul and Washington, as she was blacklisted last year by the U.S. Treasury Department over human rights abuses and censorship, while Choe faces a travel ban under U.N. Security Council sanctions.Kim Yo Jong is vice director of the party’s Propaganda and Agitation Department, which handles ideological messaging through the media, arts and culture. Choe had previously worked for the same body.“One of the positives of her visit is that she is someone able to deliver a direct message on behalf of Kim Jong Un,” said Shin Beom-chul, a professor at the Korea National Diplomatic Academy in Seoul.

“What is problematic is that she’s coming with Choe HwiThis raises worries that North Korea likely intends to use this Olympics as a propaganda tool, rather than a possible opening to meaningful dialogue with South Korea.”Pence said after talks with Abe in Tokyo on Wednesday that Washington would soon unveil its toughest ever economic sanctions on North Korea, calling the country the “most tyrannical and oppressive regime on the planet”.Choi Kang, vice president of the Asan Institute for Policy Studies in the South Korean capital, Seoul.

“The United States would be unhappy to see South Korea trying to undermine all the rigid sanctions that it had worked so hard to put in place by granting exemptions for the sake of the Olympics,” he added.